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Here's a guide to assemble your Slim Case for Raspberry Pi 3 A+ (Plus).

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The Micro:bit by BBC is a great data collection tool, it just needs a little help remembering what it has measured! This tutorial is made for those Micro:bit projects where transmitting your sensor data over radio or Bluetooth to a computer just won’t cut it. To take it one step further, this solution uses MakeCode (it works with any code).

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The Micro:bit is great for small portable projects like a soil moisture sensor. In this tutorial, we will walk through how to program a Micro:bit to make a reliable and consistent soil moisture sensor that will give consistent readings. The goal of this project is to create a program that will give consistent readings between plants. We will be using MakeCode to program the Micro:bit.

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Arduino is the most common programming language amongst maker electronics, and it has the lowest level control of any of the programming languages available to the Circuit Playground.

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You’ve got your project working, now its time to mount it. It could be on the end of a wand or in a 3D printed box. In this section, we will learn a little about creating a safe housing for the Circuit Playground.

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One of the fun features of the Circuit Playground is the capacitive touch-sensitive pads. They can be a little finicky sometimes, so this section is about making the most of the capacitive touch-sensitive pads.

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When making a project with the Circuit Playground, perhaps the most important step is securing the board to the project. This applies whether what you are making is a jacket, box or magic wand. It is safe to use bolts, threads, alligator clips and just about anything else to secure your Circuit Playground. There are a lot of 3.3v and GND pins available, so I recommend using these as your anchor points.

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One of the best ways to create a housing for the Circuit Playground is to 3D Print one! There are a couple of things you should keep in mind when creating a 3D printed box for your project!

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In this chapter, we will learn about how to make your Circuit Playground Express talk! This could mean communicating with another Circuit Playground or a computer.

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In the centre of the Circuit Playground, to the left and right of the accelerometer is the infrared (IR) transmitter and receiver. Using IR to communicate on the Circuit Playground is easy! We use the network block to select a number to transmit, and a network block to receive numbers and store them as a variable. We can also send variables that are stored as numbers, such as RGB colours. Most of what happens when we send an IR signal happens behind the scenes.

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The Circuit Playground Express can be recognized as an HID device by a computer, and we can use MakeCode to program it! Under the Advanced menu, there is an option for “Extensions” there we can add the ability to use the Circuit Playground as a Mouse, Keyboard, or even a gamepad! New blocks will appear to be able to perform these functions once they are selected under extensions.

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Is your project getting too complex for MakeCode? Interested in exploring the other ways that we can program the Circuit Playground Express? Luck for you there are three more ways that we can program the Circuit Playground! By now we are familiar with MakeCode, so let’s take a look at the other ways.

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To program with Javascript you use the MakeCode editor but change your interface to be Javascript. Javascript is easy to program, and all the commands that are available in MakeCode are also available in Javascript. One of the coolest features of programming in Javascript within MakeCode is that you retain all the great libraries that MakeCode offers. Plus, you can drag and drop code segments from the menu column just like blocks. This seriously speeds up programming!

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CircuitPython is based on the Python programming language and is a derivative of MicroPython created by Adafruit. What does that mean to the user? CircuitPython is like Python with added support for hardware, and its designed for the education platforms that Adafruit makes.

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This chapter of the Circuit Playground Express Workshop will focus on making programs within MakeCode.

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Is your project growing beyond the scope of your onboard LEDs or sensors? In this section, we will discuss connecting external devices to your Circuit Playground Express. We will focus on connecting an external LED strip, and go over how to read and send data to other external devices.

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The Windows app version of MakeCode is made specifically for the Adafruit Circuit Playground Express and comes equipped with some extra features that the web browser version does not have. In this section we will show you one of the features added to the Windows App, console read. Using Console Read we view data sent from the Circuit Playground to the computer in real time. We can use this for troubleshooting or for taking readings.

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The Circuit Playground Express comes with ten NeoPixel RGB LEDs right on the board. Controlling them with MakeCode is easy! In this section will discuss the various ways to control the NeoPixels, and how to incorporate them into your project!

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There are eight different ways we can interact with the Circuit Playground straight out of the box, and no limit to the sensors and devices that we could connect externally

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Time to play a tune on your Circuit Playground Express! In this section, we will discuss how to make music on your Circuit Playground! We will go over the basics of tune design and walk you through making a song of your own.

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We are collecting all this great data from remote (but not too remote) sensors and sending it out hoping someone will listen. Now its time to make the receiver.

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The Micro:bit has an accelerometer built right in. We can use this sensor to simulate an earthquake sensor. By adding the acceleration of the x and y-axis we can measure the total acceleration the board is undergoing. To make it into a seismic sensor it should be anchored to something immobile like a slab of concrete. We don’t want to wait for an earthquake to test our program so we left it loose.

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Sure you can use an Anemometer that will give you precise readings about wind speed, but its way more fun to make one yourself!

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Sure you can use an Anemometer that will give you precise readings about wind speed, but its way more fun to make one yourself!

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