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FTDI Basic Breakout 3.3/5V (Arduino Compatible)

SKU: DFR0065

$21.07 AUD, inc GST

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FTDI Basic Breakout 3.3/5V (Arduino Compatible)
21.07 AUD

SKU: DFR0065

$21.07 AUD, inc GST
1 reviews 0 5 4
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Introduction

This is a basic breakout board for the FTDI FT232RL USB to serial IC. The pinout of this board matches the FTDI cable to work with official Arduino and cloned 3.3V Arduino boards. It can also be used for general serial applications. The major difference with this board is that it brings out the DTR pin as opposed to the RTS pin of the FTDI cable. The DTR pin allows an Arduino target to auto-reset when a new Sketch is downloaded. This is a really nice feature to have and allows a sketch to be downloaded without having to hit the reset button. This board will auto reset any Arduino board that has the reset pin brought out to a 6-pin connector.

The pins labeled BLK and GRN correspond to the colored wires on the FTDI cable. The black wire on the FTDI cable is GND, green is DTR. Use these BLK and GRN pins to align the FTDI basic board with your Arduino target.

There are pros and cons to the FTDI Cable vs the FTDI Basic. This board has TX and RX LEDs that allow you to actually see serial traffic on the LEDs to verify if the board is working, but this board requires a miniB cable. The FTDI Cable is well protected against the elements, but is large and cannot be embedded into a project as easily. The FTDI Basic uses DTR to cause a hardware reset where the FTDI cable uses the RTS signal.

This board was designed to decrease the cost of Arduino development and increase ease of use (the auto-reset feature rocks!). Our Arduino Pro and LilyPad boards use this type of connector.

Specification

  • 3.3/5V output(switchable via Jumpers)

Documents

Compatiblity

This product is listed in:

Documentation and Resources:
  • How to use an ESP8266 in the Arduino IDE
  • In August of 2014 Shanghai-based chip manufacturer, Espressif, released a ultra-cheap Serial to Wi-Fi chip called the ESP-01. At the heart of the ESP01 was an ESP8266 chip broken out into the 8 pins needed to program it via a microcontroller. You cou...

Product Comments

Documentation and Resources:
  • How to use an ESP8266 in the Arduino IDE
  • In August of 2014 Shanghai-based chip manufacturer, Espressif, released a ultra-cheap Serial to Wi-Fi chip called the ESP-01. At the heart of the ESP01 was an ESP8266 chip broken out into the 8 pins needed to program it via a microcontroller. You cou...

Customer Reviews

  1. Review by Ken - Works well but has confusing layout verified purchaser
    Rating
    80

    The device works well once it is hooked up properly. But to connect to the Arduino Pro Mini I had to mount it "upside down" to work. That is chip side down when the Pro Mini was chip side up. Unfortunately I had assumed they would both be chip side up when I soldered the right angle pins to the Pro Mini. (Posted on 2/12/2014)

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